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Instructions and scribe template.

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Justin Hsu 3 years ago
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  1. 76
      website/docs/assignments/presentations.md
  2. 53
      website/docs/assignments/summaries.md
  3. 38
      website/docs/org.md
  4. 110
      website/docs/resources/summary-template.tex
  5. 2
      website/docs/schedule/deadlines.md
  6. 1
      website/mkdocs.yml

76
website/docs/assignments/presentations.md

@ -1,27 +1,30 @@
During this class, you will be responsible for presenting one paper in class and
leading the discussion. [Here](../resources/readings.md) is a list of suggested
papers; you are free to choose a paper that is not on the list, but please clear
it with me first. The day before each presentation, I will send out a few short
questions to check your understanding. Please reply with short responses---a few
sentences should be more than enough.
Research papers are written for a very specific technical audience. Papers
appearing in conferences---most papers in computer science---are also subject to
tight page limits and are typically extremely condensed; many things are left
unsaid. (Here is a useful
# Paper presentations
In groups of two you will lead one lecture, presenting a few related papers and
guiding the discussion. We will have presentations most Wednesdays and Fridays.
Please sign up for a presentation slot by **Monday, September 9**; see the
[calendar](schedule/lectures.md) for the topic and papers for each slot.
## Presentation tips
Research papers are written for a very specific audience, different from (and
much narrower than) our class. Papers published in conferences---most papers in
computer science---are also subject to tight page limits and are typically
extremely condensed; many key things are left unsaid. (Here is a useful
[guide](https://web.stanford.edu/class/ee384m/Handouts/HowtoReadPaper.pdf) to
reading papers.) When presenting a paper in class, you should not try to
compress the material from the paper. Instead, you should try to expand and
unpack the paper, so that it is easier to understand.
reading papers.) When presenting a paper in class, you should not try to cover
every last detail in the paper. Instead, you should try to unpack the paper so
that it is easier to understand, expanding on the motivation, adding examples,
comparing concepts across papers, etc.
Here are a few specific things to keep in mind when presenting a paper.
- **Make sure the high-level picture is clear.** Make sure to explain the
problem the paper is trying to solve, the setting, and as much of the
motivation behind the paper as possible.
- **Don't spend the whole time presenting technical details.** It is probably
not interesting for the class to spend the whole presentation talking about
the technical details in a single proof.
- **Don't spend the whole time presenting technical details.** For instance, it
is probably not interesting for the class to spend the whole presentation
talking about the technical details in a single proof.
- **You don't have to present the whole paper.** It is simply not possible to
present every detail in the span of one lecture. For some papers, it may not
even be possible to present each main contribution. Focus on the one or two
@ -38,4 +41,41 @@ Here are a few specific things to keep in mind when presenting a paper.
assume that everyone in the class has basic familiarity with the paper (say,
assume everyone spent about 30-45 minutes reading the paper before class).
You may use the chalkboard during the presentation, or slides.
## FAQ
- **How should presenters prepare?**
The presenters should meet with me **one week before** their presentation to
discuss an outline of what you will be presenting.
- **How long should presentations be?**
Each presentation should be about **60 minutes**, leaving the remainder of the
time for a wrap-up discussion. It's fine to be a few minutes over or under, but
if you think you will finish more than 5 minutes early you should consider
adding more material.
- **Can we use visual aids?**
You should use the chalkboard and/or slides for your presentation.
- **How should non-presenters prepare?**
**Before** every presentation, all students are expected to read the papers
closely and understand their significance, including (a) the main problems, (b)
the primary contributions, and (c) how the technical solution. Of course, you
are also expected to attend discussions and actively participate in the
discussion.
- **We wanted to present about XYZ, but another group is presenting!**
While we will try to accommodate everyone's interests, we may need to
adjust the selections for better balance and coverage. Consider picking a
different topic---maybe you'll learn something new!
- **Can we present other papers instead?**
If you want to present different papers on the same topic, or change the topic
entirely, please talk to me first. Note that the papers have been selected to be
related and focused on a specific topic. There is an additional list of
suggested papers [here](resources/readings.md).

53
website/docs/assignments/summaries.md

@ -0,0 +1,53 @@
# Presentation summaries
In groups of two you will write up a detailed summary of another group's
presentation. Please sign up for a report slot by **Monday, September 9**; see
the [calendar](schedule/lectures.md) for the topic and suggested papers for each
slot.
## Summary tips
- The summary should synthesize the main points in the presentation and in-class
discussion, filling in gaps or elaborating on unclear points. Do not simply
transcribe verbatim what everyone said during class.
- You may have to refer to the source papers to clear up some details, but the
report should be primarily focused on what was presented: this will be both
more and less than what was in the original papers. These are not paper
summaries; they are presentation summaries.
- You will need to take detailed notes, or even make an audio recording.
- If you have questions, the best time to ask is **during the presentation**.
- See [here](http://www.cs.columbia.edu/~djhsu/coms6998-f17/instructions.html#instructions-for-scribe) for more on summaries.
- See [here](http://www.cs.columbia.edu/~djhsu/coms6998-f17/scribe.html) for common things to watch for as you prepare your reports.
I will then work with you to polish the notes and then upload them to
Canvas---submit something that you would be proud for your classmates to see!
## FAQ
- **When are summaries due?**
Within **one week** of the presentation, while the details are still fresh in
your mind.
- **How should we type up summaries?**
Notes should be typed up neatly in LaTeX using this
[template](resources/summary-template.tex). You may make additional macros if
needed, but try to stick to what is there.
- **How should we turn in summaries?**
Share your summary with me by sending a link to [ShareLaTeX](sharelatex.com).
Note that you can work on the summary in some other environment, then copy to
ShareLaTeX if you prefer.
- **How long should summaries be?**
There is no set length, but the summary should be detailed enough for a reader
to reconstruct most of what happened during the presentation in a fair amount of
detail.
- **What should I do if I don't know LaTeX?**
Try to find a partner who does know LaTeX, or you will need to get up to speed
with tutorials (e.g., [here](https://www.overleaf.com/learn/latex/Learn_LaTeX_in_30_minutes)).

38
website/docs/org.md

@ -25,45 +25,13 @@ These three components are detailed below.
### Paper presentations
In groups of two you will lead one lecture, presenting 1-2 related papers and
guiding the discussion. We will have presentations most Wednesdays and Fridays.
Each presentation should be about **60 minutes**, leaving the remainder of the
time for a wrap-up discussion. The presenters should meet with me instructor
**one week before** their presentation to discuss an outline of what you will
be presenting.
Before every presentation, all students are expected to read the papers closely
and understand their significance, including (a) the main problems, (b) the
primary contributions, and (c) how the technical solution. Of course, you are
also expected to attend discussions and actively participate in the discussion.
We will be reading about topics from the recent research literature. Most
research papers focus on a very narrow topic and are written for a very specific
technical audience. It also doesn't help that researchers are generally not the
clearest writers, though there are certainly exceptions. These
[notes](https://web.stanford.edu/class/ee384m/Handouts/HowtoReadPaper.pdf) by
Srinivasan Keshav may help you get more out of reading papers.
Please sign up for a presentation slot by **Monday, September 9**; see the
[calendar](schedule/lectures.md) for the topic and suggested papers for each
slot. While we will try to accommodate everyone's interests, we may need to
adjust the selections for better balance and coverage.
In groups of two you will lead one lecture, presenting a few related papers and
guiding the discussion; details [here](assignments/presentations.md).
### Presentation reports
In groups of two you will write up a detailed summary of another group's
presentation. The summary should capture the main points in the presentation and
summarize the in-class discussion, possibly filling in gaps or elaborating on
unclear points. You may have to refer to the source papers to clear up some
details, but the report should be primarily focused on what was presented: this
will be both more and less than what was in the original papers. Notes should
be typed up neatly in LaTeX using these [templates](XYZ) and sent to me within
**one week** of the presentation using [ShareLaTeX](sharelatex.com). I will then
work with you to polish the notes and then upload them to Canvas---please submit
something that you would be proud for your classmates to see!
Please sign up for a report slot by **Monday, September 9**; see the
[calendar](schedule/lectures.md) for the topic and suggested papers for each
slot.
presentation; details [here](assignments/summaries.md).
### Course Project

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website/docs/resources/summary-template.tex

@ -0,0 +1,110 @@
\documentclass[twoside]{article}
\setlength{\oddsidemargin}{0.25 in}
\setlength{\evensidemargin}{-0.25 in}
\setlength{\topmargin}{-0.6 in}
\setlength{\textwidth}{6.5 in}
\setlength{\textheight}{8.5 in}
\setlength{\headsep}{0.75 in}
\setlength{\parindent}{0 in}
\setlength{\parskip}{0.1 in}
%
% ADD PACKAGES here:
%
\usepackage{amsmath,amsthm,amssymb,amsfonts,graphicx}
%
% The following commands set up the lecnum (lecture number)
% counter and make various numbering schemes work relative
% to the lecture number.
%
\newcounter{lecnum}
\renewcommand{\thepage}{\thelecnum-\arabic{page}}
\renewcommand{\thesection}{\thelecnum.\arabic{section}}
\renewcommand{\theequation}{\thelecnum.\arabic{equation}}
\renewcommand{\thefigure}{\thelecnum.\arabic{figure}}
\renewcommand{\thetable}{\thelecnum.\arabic{table}}
%
% The following macro is used to generate the header.
%
\newcommand{\lecture}[4]{%
\pagestyle{myheadings}
\thispagestyle{plain}
\newpage
\setcounter{lecnum}{#1}
\setcounter{page}{1}
\noindent
\begin{center}
\framebox{
\vbox{\vspace{2mm} \hbox to 6.28in { {\bf CS 763: Security and Privacy in Data Science \hfill Fall 2019} }
\vspace{4mm}
\hbox to 6.28in { {\Large \hfill Lecture #1: #2 \hfill} }
\vspace{2mm}
\hbox to 6.28in { {\it Lecturer: #3 \hfill Scribes: #4} }
\vspace{2mm}}
}
\end{center}
\markboth{Lecture #1: #2}{Lecture #1: #2}
}
% Use these for theorems, lemmas, proofs, etc.
\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}[lecnum]
\newtheorem{lemma}[theorem]{Lemma}
\newtheorem{proposition}[theorem]{Proposition}
\newtheorem{claim}[theorem]{Claim}
\newtheorem{corollary}[theorem]{Corollary}
\newtheorem{definition}[theorem]{Definition}
%% mathbb
\newcommand{\BB}{\mathbb{B}}
\newcommand{\CC}{\mathbb{C}}
\newcommand{\EE}{\mathbb{E}}
\newcommand{\FF}{\mathbb{F}}
\newcommand{\LL}{\mathbb{L}}
\newcommand{\NN}{\mathbb{N}}
\newcommand{\PP}{\mathbb{P}}
\newcommand{\QQ}{\mathbb{Q}}
\newcommand{\RR}{\mathbb{R}}
\newcommand{\ZZ}{\mathbb{Z}}
%% mathcal
\def\cA{{\cal A}}
\def\cB{{\cal B}}
\def\cC{{\cal C}}
\def\cD{{\cal D}}
\def\cE{{\cal E}}
\def\cF{{\cal F}}
\def\cH{{\cal H}}
\def\cI{{\cal I}}
\def\cJ{{\cal J}}
\def\cK{{\cal K}}
\def\cL{{\cal L}}
\def\cM{{\cal M}}
\def\cN{{\cal N}}
\def\cO{{\cal O}}
\def\cP{{\cal P}}
\def\cQ{{\cal Q}}
\def\cR{{\cal R}}
\def\cS{{\cal S}}
\def\cT{{\cal T}}
\def\cU{{\cal U}}
\def\cV{{\cal V}}
\def\cW{{\cal W}}
\def\cX{{\cal X}}
\def\cY{{\cal Y}}
\def\cZ{{\cal Z}}
% **** IF YOU WANT TO DEFINE ADDITIONAL MACROS FOR YOURSELF, PUT THEM HERE:
\begin{document}
%
% **** FILL IN THE RIGHT INFO ****
%
%\lecture{**LECTURE-NUMBER**}{**TOPIC**}{**LECTURER**}{**SCRIBE**}
\lecture{0}{Topic}{Presenters}{Scribes}
\end{document}

2
website/docs/schedule/deadlines.md

@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
The first key date is **September 9**. By this date, you should:
- **Sign up** to present a paper.
- **Sign up** with a partner to present and scribe.
- **Form project groups** of three.
- **Brainstorm** project topics. Try to come up with **1-2 sentences**
describing your initial direction. This is not a firm commitment---you can

1
website/mkdocs.yml

@ -29,5 +29,6 @@ nav:
- Related Courses: 'resources/related.md'
- Assignments:
- Presentations: 'assignments/presentations.md'
- Summaries: 'assignments/summaries.md'
- Projects: 'assignments/project.md'
- Gallery: 'assignments/gallery.md'

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