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Project reports?

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Justin Hsu 3 years ago
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website/docs/org.md

@ -17,28 +17,25 @@ Data Privacy* (AFDP) by Cynthia Dwork and Aaron Roth, available
Grades will be assigned as follows:
- **Paper presentations: 25%**
- **Homeworks: 15%**
- **Paper presentations: 20%**
- **Presentation reports: 20%**
- **Final project: 60%** (Milestones 1 and 2, and final writeup)
These three components are detailed below.
### Paper presentations
**Paper discussions** are one of the main components of this course. In groups
of two (or very rarely three), you will present 1-2 papers on a related topic
and lead the discussion. We will have presentations most Wednesdays and Fridays,
In groups of two you will lead one lecture, presenting 1-2 related papers and
guiding the discussion. We will have presentations most Wednesdays and Fridays.
Each presentation should be about **60 minutes**, leaving the remainder of the
time for a wrap-up discussion. Please sign up for a slot by **Monday, September
9**; see the [calendar](schedule/lectures.md) for the topic and suggested papers
for each slot. While we will try to accommodate everyone's interests, we may
need to adjust the selections for better balance and coverage.
time for a wrap-up discussion. The presenters should meet with me instructor
**one week before** their presentation to discuss an outline of what you will
be presenting.
Before every presentation, all students are expected to read the papers closely
and understand their significance, including (a) the main problems, (b) the
primary contributions, and (c) how the technical solution. Of course, you are
also expected to attend discussions and actively participate in the discussion.
We will be reading about topics from the recent research literature. Most
research papers focus on a very narrow topic and are written for a very specific
technical audience. It also doesn't help that researchers are generally not the
@ -46,12 +43,27 @@ clearest writers, though there are certainly exceptions. These
[notes](https://web.stanford.edu/class/ee384m/Handouts/HowtoReadPaper.pdf) by
Srinivasan Keshav may help you get more out of reading papers.
### Homeworks
There will be three small homework assignments, one for each of the core
modules, where you will play with software implementations of the methods we
cover in class. These assignments will be lightly graded; the goal is to give
you a chance to write some code and run some experiments.
Please sign up for a presentation slot by **Monday, September 9**; see the
[calendar](schedule/lectures.md) for the topic and suggested papers for each
slot. While we will try to accommodate everyone's interests, we may need to
adjust the selections for better balance and coverage.
### Presentation reports
In groups of two you will write up a detailed summary of another group's
presentation. The summary should capture the main points in the presentation and
summarize the in-class discussion, possibly filling in gaps or elaborating on
unclear points. You may have to refer to the source papers to clear up some
details, but the report should be primarily focused on what was presented: this
will be both more and less than what was in the original papers. Notes should
be typed up neatly in LaTeX using these [templates](XYZ) and sent to me within
**one week** of the presentation using [ShareLaTeX](sharelatex.com). I will then
work with you to polish the notes and then upload them to Canvas---please submit
something that you would be proud for your classmates to see!
Please sign up for a report slot by **Monday, September 9**; see the
[calendar](schedule/lectures.md) for the topic and suggested papers for each
slot.
### Course Project

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